{Treasure} Grandma Shirley Notes Part 2

My husband’s grandmother, Shirley (Gingg) Pope was the genealogist in her family. She accomplished an amazing amount of research using traditional snail mail methods. As I wrote last week, it was amazing to find some of her original organized written notes. You can read that post here – Treasure, Grandma Shirley Notes Part 1.

The next couple of posts will focus on the longer document she wrote. It was approximately 14 pages front and back on most sheets. The 4×6 paper was stapled together at the top of the short side of the paper.

I am not posting the first couple of pages, as they include mostly information regarding living persons. There are also a few other spots which will be covered with grey boxes to preserve privacy for living individuals. You will also notice on the individual images that Shirley made handwritten changes to her own information. These usually include information crossed out or additional information added in another ink. Transcriptions will be below each page.

Today’s pages focus on the paternal ancestry of Shirley Gingg Pope.

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes page 3

Shirley’s History

Charles Franklin Gingg* (Padgitt)
San Francisco, Calif. Born Oct 5, 1905 – Calif Died Oct 26, 1957 Weed, Calif.

M.

Agnes Marie Mattson
Born May 1, 1909 San Francisco, Calif.
Died March 22, 1982 Healdsburg, Calif. Olivet Cem. S.F.

Children

1 – Shirley Marie – Born 9-16-1927 S.F. Calif

My father died in Weed, Calif of a heart
attack. He was on his way back to Ketchikan,
Alaska after a vacation. Funeral Services
held in S.F. – ashes taken to Alaska for
burial by his wife, Cecile Gingg.

My father and mother separated in the 1930’s.

*Surname “Gingg” was from step-father –
real fathers name was “Padgitt.

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes backside of page 3

My father was a linotype operator,
employed by the Ketchikan Daily News,
Ketchikan, Alaska, at the time of his death.

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes page 4

Paternal

John Alfred Padgitt
Born Feb 1, 1878 Cumberland County, Illinois
Died May 27, 1948 Leavenworth, Kansas

M

Carrie Belle Wells
Born Aug 7, 1886 Arcata – California
Died Nov. 30th 1967 San Francisco, Calif
Buried – Holy Cross – Colma

Married
2d William Carl Gingg
3d R. Bert Trouslot
4 Patrick Teahan

Children
1 – Charles Franklin
Oct 5, 1905 S.F.

2 – Ella Catherine
Born July 29, 1906
San Leandro, Calif

Carrie Belle married Wm. Carl Gingg
3 – Lucille Leroy
March 20, 1911

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes backside of page 4

Data

My Grandfather, John Alfred, enlisted
Company K – 32nd regiment of Infantry
Aug. 4, 1899. Was discharged May 8, 1901.

Served as a cook. Spanish
American War. He remarried also.

Catherine M Homer Futrell – B. Feb 2, 1899 Grant Parish, La

child
1 –

Lucille M Louis Palmini – Sept 3 1932

Children
1-
2-

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes page 5

Paternal

Charles Britton Wells
Born Dec 16th 1844 (Probably) Sedalia, Mo.
Died Jan 1920 Oakland, Calif.

(was in the Confederate Army)

9 Brothers (?)
Clay
Wes
John
Oliver H.P.
Mary E

M

Nancy Annis Malone
Born Dec 6, 1852 Near Mississippi
Died Sept. 5, 1941 San Francisco, Calif
Buried – Oakland – Evergreen Cemetery

6 sisters & 1 brother

1st child was stillborn – male

Children

  1. Carrie Belle
  2. Virginia Elnora (Booth)

Nancy Annis, my great-grandmother was in
her 89;s wehen she died. I remember her as
a very old woman, always kind to me.
She was living in Tenn. at the time of the
Civil War. (?)

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes backside of page 5

Charles Britton Wells was a blacksmith by trade.

John and Shirley Pope Family Notes Page 6

Paternal

John S. Wells (welsh ancestry)
Born probably Kentucky
Died

M

Susan Zilhart (German Ancestry)
Born Kentucky
Died Sedalia, Missouri

Known Children
1 – Charles Britton Wells
9 brothers (?) See 1850 1870 census

John Leonard Malone (Ireland)
Born Tennessee
Died

M

Mary Anne Jones (Scotch English)
Born Probaby Texas
Died

Known Children
1 – Mary Annis

Mary Anne Jones is supposed to have been
descented from realtives of “John Paul Jones”

{Treasure} Handwritten Notes Part 1

I was lucky enough to have two years with my husband’s grandmother before she passed. Shirley (Gingg) Pope was a loving and caring woman. But don’t be fooled, she had a well of strength in her bones. We shared the love of genealogy. Shirley gets all the credit for doing her research via mail. She wrote numerous letters to people and repositories.

Shirley left a treasure trove of family history documents. After my husband’s grandfather left us to reunite with Shirley, we found even more amazing treasures. These included physical items such as fraternal order pins, military medals, and handwritten notes.

After going through so many pieces of paper research, I believe I found some of Grandma Shirley’s first handwritten notes. There are two sets. The first is one page of notes regarding Grandpa John’s ancestors. The second is 10 pages (some have notes on back) of the summary of what Shirley knew at the time. The 10 pages are on notepaper approximately 4″ wide and 6″ tall. They are held together by 2 staples.

I find it incredible to have Grandma Shirley’s handwritten notes. Her handwriting feels like a hug.

I have digitized the notes as part of my emergency preparedness push. I am including the first page in today’s post. All of the information has been added to both my personal research and online trees (FamilySearch and Ancestry). The only item that is inaccurate on this note is the father of Anna Hink. Further research completed by Shirley found Anna’s parents to be Johann Hink and Anna (Last Name Unknown).

Note* The children are listed as birth events. Elfrieda Johanna and Claus Alfred were twins.

Notes written by Shirley Pope.
Notes written by Shirley Pope.

John Pope m. Catherine Offerman

Pope side

  1. Anna Louise Pope Robinson

b  Nov 29, 1895 (?)

d  June 1961

2. John Rudolph Pope                        died 19 yrs.

Flu epidemic in S.F.

3. Elfrieda Johann Pope Fancher    Sept 19, 1901

Claus Alfred Pope                           Sept 19, 1901 – June 23, 1971

There was a baby born (the (1st one) who died early

and his name was John.

Poppe side – Sandbostal, Germany

Offerman side – Hechthausen, Germany

Catherine Offerman

Claus Henry Offerman                   Anna Hink

                                                            Adolf Hink           ?

Fires and Genealogy

Just under three years ago, a wind event in Northern California started at least 12 fires. These fires devastated large portions of Sonoma and Napa counties. The Tubbs fire, just to the north of my home, ravaged the city of Santa Rosa in just hours. Everyone knew one or more people who lost their home in the fires.

Just a year later in 2018, the Mendocino Complex Fire became the largest fire in California history with just under a half million acres burned. Sadly, just months later, the Camp Fire claimed the title of most deadly in California when 85 people lost their lives as the towns of Paradise and Concow were destroyed.

Once again a wind event wreaked havoc in October 2019. The Kincade fire was not deadly or quite as destructive as the previous years. The threat was large enough over 180,000 people were evacuated from their homes.

Now in 2020, Northern California is facing fire again. Just over a week ago, we experienced a crazy thunderstorm which saw over 10,000 lightning bolts light up the sky. Unfortunately, this led to many small fires that have merged into several massive fires. Every Bay Area county except San Francisco has a major fire burning in it.

Screenshot from AlertWildfire Black Mountain Marin camera. The 747 Supertanker is getting ready to approach for a fire retardant drop on the Woodward fire in Point Reyes National Seashore.

So what does this have to do with genealogy?

First, those of us in California need to be documenting our history for future generations. How were we impacted, what did we do to help, how did we feel, how has fire changed the way we live? These stories will personalize history for our descendants.

Second, as a genealogist, I want to protect the research I have done. I find there are two components to this plan. A specific evacuation plan including identifying genealogy materials and where on the list they fall for packing the car is super important. Next is digitizing all paper materials to make the evacuation plan more manageable.

My family reviewed our evacuation plan this past weekend. We checked our emergency go boxes for what needed to be updated (first aid, food, toothpaste, etc). We also checked our evacuation go list. The list is in order of importance for packing the car. This is to help determine what gets grabbed depending on the amount of time we have. We also figured out that my genealogy treasures will fit in the car (along with kids, dog, etc.)

Every year as fire season takes it toll, I say I am going to digitize everything. Every year I have made small gains before becoming distracted and not completing the project. I am determined to tackle and FINISH digitizing a couple boxes of paper this year. I have started by reviewing my scan, cite, save process. I have a box out and using a phone scanning app, a few items have already been crossed off the list. Some of these items will start to appear as blog posts.

Have you thought about what will happen to your genealogy treasures in the event of an emergency or natural disaster? What have you done to prepare?

Another Year, Another Blog Post

I may not have been the most prolific blog writer in the last year but I have made it to another blog anniversary. Looking back to when I started this blog, I was 8 months pregnant and temporarily living in my in-law’s house. I had taken nesting to another level and had to move while some renovations were being completed. I wrote those initial blog posts while my 2 year old napped.

Fast forward nine years and my situation does not feel too different. While I am in my own home, we are under a shelter in place order for the Covid-19 pandemic. My kids, now 11 and almost 9, have been home for almost 3 weeks. I am writing this blogpost while they are in online learning.

Here in Northern California, we received the notice that schools would be closing on a Friday. That weekend was filled with Facebook dreams of color coded schedules by parents who had not a clue what the coming days would actually turn out to be. I too was enthusiastic but in a genealogy way. I had a plan to use all that school time to work on research and write blog posts.

Of course my color coded genealogy dream needed some major shelter in place adjustments also. Just like the start of online schooling, within 24 hours my plan was turned sideways and flipped upside down. I quickly realized you cannot write blog posts without a healthy website. Since I have not been writing regularly, I was not logging into the website to deal with maintenance issues. With some help, I am now up and running again. In a way it feels appropriate that all the issues were resolved today. A mini-rebirth of the blog is way more meaningful when it happens on the anniversary of my first blog post.

So here is to another year and good health for all (including this blog)!!

Best Laid Plans

This spring has been an exciting time for me. After years of planning, our house remodel got underway. We moved temporarily while the bulk of the work was quickly finished. Most of our belongings got boxed and stored in our bedrooms. I boxed up all of my genealogy items with a grand plan. I was going to work each morning for an hour to sort, organize, catalog, and properly store my genealogy related items. I even brought a Gaylord Archival catalog for easy ordering. I would move all my genealogy stuff back to our home beautifully boxed and cataloged.

Unfortunately, this is not what happened. I grossly underestimated what was involved with our construction project. Instead of my genealogy project, most mornings were spent at my house making decisions or running to different vendors for orders/pickups. I will not lie – I am completely okay with my project failure. We were able to move back in quickly (in construction time) and I absolutely love everything we have done to our home. From a genealogy prospective, it is time to just pick up and try again .

Genealogist Janine Adams has a great blog (The Organized Genealogist) and a great podcast (Getting to Good Enough). I am an avid podcast listener and subscribe to Janine’s podcast. There have been several episodes I have completely identified with. The theme of these episodes usually deals with getting back on track after falling off a habit or backsliding. It is like Janine and Shannon are speaking directly to me. It is great to be reminded the most important thing is to keep trying when things do not work out. Good enough includes letting go of the guilt.

Where does that leave me? Well, the 7 boxes of genealogy that left my house got moved back in the exact way they left. Brown moving boxes. Some reorganizing as we unpacked our home has led to a dedicated genealogy bookshelf in our office closet. Most of the items in the boxes have been moved to the new shelving. I still plan on cataloging and properly storing everything I have. I am carefully planning this time so I can be successful in completing my project. If I tried to start now, my attempt would be interrupted by kids, dogs, and vacation since school is out for summer. Being honest with myself about time management puts my project off until late August when my girls go back to school.

The follow up to this post will not be “Try, Try, Again” but instead read “Mission Accomplished.”

Another Year To Celebrate

I was surprised to see today is the 8th anniversary of this genealogy blog! It seems like just last year I started writing about my family history. I guess I should not be too surprised since I was pregnant with my 2nd child when this blog started. Note to self – #2’s birthday is coming up.

I do not write as often as the first few years of my genealogy blog. I still keep trying and that is what makes fewer posts okay for me. I have more stories to tell and I look forward to getting them out in the universe!

Adding A Face To A Name – Louis Radvanyi

Last week I was preparing a presentation I was giving at my local genealogy society. I was trying to locate a photo I wanted to include in the presentation. The photo was from 2004 so I was pretty sure it had been printed and placed into a photo album. The big question? Where was the safe place I put the photo album?!

I started tearing my office apart and flipping through all of the photo albums on the bookshelf. One album caught my eye. It is a photo album my husband’s grandmother had created for him. What made me stop and look was a photo of Grandma June and one of hubby’s best friends from college. The caption had me laughing out loud. I called my husband over and we began to flip through the album together. Most people know I am easily distracted by fun things!

Let me pause here to give you history about hubby’s family. Hubby’s great grandfather, Louis Radvanyi immigrated to the United States from Hungary. He lived in Whiting, Indiana where he worked as a painter at Standard Oil. He married Maria Nagy and had six children. Unfortunately, Louis passed away in his forties when he was hit by a car. Louis left very little documentation during his life in the United States.

My mother in law has told me a photo of Louis hung in her home as a young girl. Her memory is her Aunt Angie (One of Louis and Mary’s children) had taken the photo in order to duplicate it for all the siblings. The photo did not make it back to her childhood home. My mother in law did not know where the photo was located. Only that it was the only representation of her grandfather that existed. Over the years, I have reached out to a couple of my mother-in-law’s cousins to try to locate the photo.

Back to my crazed search for a photo. The funny caption from Hubby’s grandmother made me pause to flip through the rest of the photo album. I wanted to see what she had included. There were photos of my husband spanning his entire life. Most photos were a either of Hubby or Hubby and Grandma June.

Then there was the photo of a picture! It is a picture of the painting of Louis Radvanyi!!! We have finally added a face to the name. Apparently at some point before giving the photo to Angie, Grandma June had taken a photo of the picture of Louis.

Grandma June passed away in November 2017. She had moved out of her house about eight years before her death in order to received more care. I believe we came into possession of the photo album about that time as her house was cleaned out. I cannot believe we had a copy of this photo for so long and did not even know it!!

Good news about my presentation! I eventually found the photo I was looking for. The photo album was with my genealogy books and notebooks on the bookshelf. Right where it was supposed to be.

{Treasure Chest} Maria (Nagy) Radvanyi Death Certificate

Maria Nagy is my husband’s great grandmother. She was born 7 March 1888 in Jablonca, Abaúj-Torna, Hungary. After immigrating to the United States with her parents as a 1 year old baby, the family lived in Lake County, Indiana. Mary married Louis Radvanyi and raised her family in the same area. Maria passed away 6 April 1950 in Whiting, Lake, Indiana.

This is her death certificate:

Aloha 2019!

I hope everyone had a happy holiday season! To start the New Year I decided to update my WordPress blog to the new 5.0 update. There is a completely new editor in this version that works very differently than the prior versions. Think moving from Word to something totally not Word.

I am up for the challenge and in some ways the new format makes sense. I will be spending the rest of the week trying to find some how to videos to make sure I am using the new editor correctly. I also need to learn how the plugins work with this new setup because I already see that my spell checker seems to be missing.

In the near future, if you see something that looks funky, not to worry, I will figure it out soon enough. Mahalo!! (I am full of Hawaiian spirit because we just got home from a great trip to Maui!)

{Treasure Chest} Gwendolyn June Fuller Birth Certificate

My husband’s grandmother was known to everyone as June. The only person who called her Gwendolyn on a regular basis was my husband. He did it just to push her buttons. I think he got away with it because he was the oldest grandson.

June passed away 6 November 2017. June was born 4 February 1925 in Havelock neighborhood, outside of Lincoln, Nebraska. At the time, Havelock was part of the county of Lancaster, Nebraska. Today Havelock resides within the city limits of Lincoln, Nebraska.

June’s parents were Percy Fuller and Lauretta Palmatier. June was born 17 and 15 years after her older brothers (Raymond and Marshall). Her parents were 38 and 36 at the time of her birth.

I realized in 2018 I did not have a copy of June’s birth certificate. With help from my mother-in-law, one was ordered. When the certificate arrived, I was so surprised to see that June was almost not June’s name! I wish I knew the story of how her middle name changed at the last moment. It was a good choice because the name June fit her.