Wedding Wednesday – William Lawbaugh and Lydia Ummel

I mentioned in my post Following A Shiny Star Into A Genealogy Blackhole that I had found the marriage of William Lawbaugh and Lydia Ummel on FamilySearch.org.

"Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZDK-72B : accessed 11 March 2015), William Lawbaugh and Lydia Umel, 22 Nov 1849; citing Wayne, Ohio, United States, reference 430; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 425,754.
“Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZDK-72B : accessed 11 March 2015), William Lawbaugh and Lydia Umel, 22 Nov 1849; citing Wayne, Ohio, United States, reference 430; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 425,754.

William Lawbaugh to Lydia Ummel

The state of Ohio Wayne County SS.  I hereby certify that on the 22nd day of November AD 1849 Mr William Lawbaugh and miss Lydia Ummel were legally joined in marriage by me a teaching Elder in the church ????  ???? my hand this 22nd day of November 1849.  Samuel N Miller

Rest In Peace Grandma

This past Wednesday, January 31, 2014, my grandmother, Roberta Fleming passed away peacefully with her family around her.

She was known by many names including Mom, Grandma, Aunt Roberta, Birdie, and the Silver Fox.  A couple of years ago when my children, her great-grandchildren, were born we added another name, Gigi.  It was her short hand for Great Grandmother.  She wanted a fun grandma name.

Roberta Mitchell baby
Roberta Irene Mitchell

 

My grandmother was born Roberta Irene Mitchell to Dudley Moses Mitchell and Opal Blanche Strickler on January 10, 1931 in Topeka, Kansas.  She was the youngest of five children with one older sister, Loretta, and three older brothers, Raymond, Delbert, and Kenneth.

Her family moved to Hutchinson, Kansas during the Depression. Grandma stayed there until she attended X-Ray Technician school in Topeka, Kansas.  While at school, she met my grandfather, William Henry Lawbaugh.  They married in 1950.  The couple starting raising their family in Pratt, Kansas with their first three children.  They relocated to the Anaheim, California area in the late 1950’s.  There they added to the family a set of twins.  In 1964, Bill Lawbaugh passed away leaving his wife with 5 children.  Roberta went to work to provide for her family.

Roberta and Bill
Roberta and Bill Lawbaugh

 

In 1973, Roberta married James Fleming.  They joined their families Brady Bunch style, five from her side in addition to the four children Jim had. They lived in several cities in Los Angeles and Orange counties. I have many memories from my childhood of them being together.  In fact, I learned how to swim in their pool when they lived in Downey, California.  After their time in Downey, they moved to the desert, living in the Cochella Valley.

Roberta and Jim
Jim and Roberta Fleming

 

After Jim Fleming passed away in 1994, Grandma moved back to the beach.  She loved the ocean and was at home in San Clemente, California.  This was during my college years in San Diego.  At least once a month I would make the 45 minute drive north to spend the weekend with her.  We had so much fun together!

All of the facts above do not capture the entire picture.  My grandma was fun and feisty.  She LOVED her children.  It would not be a complete day without a Crown Royal and cigarette, even her dog enjoyed cocktail hour with a piece of ice.  Her house was never quiet, either the news channel was on the TV or she was playing her beloved big band music.  She loved to dance.  Our family has the great memory of dancing the night away at my cousin’s wedding this past summer.  While she was not interested in researching her family herself, she was always willing to tell me stories of her childhood and what she remembered of others in her family. Grandma was a horrendous driver.  We were always offering to chauffeur her places.  She was an avid Bridge player.  The drawer of her coffee table has many sets of playing cards and bridge score sheets.  Grandma was very neat and clean.  You were always careful to make your bed and clean up after yourself at her home.  Most of all Grandma loved being with her family.  Holidays were always big affairs with lots of food and football.  Most Sundays were spent with family on the beach.  The beach was a slice of heaven for my grandma.

Roberta 80th

I could go on and on.  She is going to be so greatly missed.  I have to take comfort in how she taught us all to be a family.  I know that although she is no longer at the head of the family, we have each other.

I love you grandma!

 

Tombstone Tuesday – William Henry Lawbaugh

Last week my family took a second trip to Southern California this summer.  Since we had visited my paternal grandfather’s grave on the last trip, I made a point to stop at my maternal grandfather’s grave this time around.  Even though I have driven past the area many times, I had never been to the cemetery before.

I am so happy we took the time to stop and pay our respects.  Not only did I get the chance to tell my children stories about their great-grandfather, I also took a picture to post to Findagrave.com.

Lawbaugh william gravestone

 

When we arrived at my grandmother’s house and I told her we had visited Bill’s grave, the stories started.  I learned my grandparents met when my grandpa was at X-Ray Technician school in Wichita, Kansas.  One of her friends in the dorm, Dee Dee, was dating a man who worked for my grandfather.  Dee Dee set them up.

The night of their first date my grandmother was very sick but decided to go out anyways.  She walked to the lobby of the dorm to meet my grandfather for the very first time.  When she saw him, her heart jumped into her throat.  The next morning the school called my great-grandmother to the school because my grandmother was so sick.  When my grandma woke up and saw her mother she said, “I met the man I am going to marry!” My great-grandmother thought it was just the illness talking but sure enough a year later my grandparents married.  The rest is history!

Follow Friday – Geneseo Public Library, Henry County, Illinois

About 1853 my 4th great-grandparents, John and Margaret Lawbaugh, migrated West from Ohio to Illinois.  They and many of their children settled in and around Geneseo, Illinois.  My 2nd great-grandfather, William Henry Lawbaugh was the next ancestor to leave the area in the late 1880’s.  I have a lot of research I want to do in this town!

I recently found myself at the Geneseo Public Library website.  I will admit I was having a random genealogy tangent moment and was not planning to check this website.  I have been here before and seen the extensive listing of genealogy materials the library holds.  I would love to take a genealogy vacation and hole up in the library to comb the materials.

This time I visited the website, I noticed a link to “digitized local newspaper.”  There are ten city and county newspapers that have been digitized and posted to the website.  The newspapers span 1856-1977!  The best part is that the database is searchable!

I did a search for my family using just the surname Lawbaugh.  The results page includes 211 hits from three newspapers over a 100 year period.  I am so excited about all the research I have on my to-do list!!

If anyone has ancestors from Geneseo, Illinois, I highly suggest visiting the Geneseo Public Library website and taking full advantage of the great resources there.

Sunday’s Obituary – Sarah J Morris

Sarah Morris is my 3rd great-grandmother.

Me to Sarah J Morris

 

She is another ancestor that I really do not know much about.  I found her obituary at the Kansas State Archives on my trip to Kansas last month.  I feel really lucky to have another great obituary in the paper to learn more about my ancestor.  Along with a lot of personal information about Sarah, the obituary has great descriptions of the grief of the family.

Hudson, Sarah obit

 

Mrs. Sarah J Hudson

Another of La Cygne’s good mothers has passed from this world to her home in heaven.  A family that she has tenderly cared for and nursed to manhood and womanhood is now deep in grief.  The old home that has been one continued pleasure for more than a quarter of a century with a good mother presiding over it is now stilled in the sadness that death brings.

Last Monday afternoon the spirit of Sarah J. wife of Frederick Hudson, departed this life and went to claim the reward in heaven that is promised to all good women.   Mrs. Hudson had been in poor health for some time and while it really could be no surprise that the silver cord of life should sever at the ripe old age the deceased had attained, yet even with that possibility the friends and relatives were unprepared to meet the crisis.  To take  from the home the mother who has been its guardian for so many years is something that is hard to temper the heart to forego.

Sarah J. Morris was born in Pike county, Illinois, August 6, 1835; she was married to Frederick Hudson December 30, 1855 and they removed to Kansas the winter of 1880 where they have resided ever since.  In the sixteenth year of her life the deceased joined the Christian church and has been a worker for the Lord ever since.  She leaves a husband, and seven children who are W.B. Hudson of Kansas City, Mrs. W.H. Lawbaugh of Wellington, Kansas, Mrs. F.H.  Howard, Mrs. Chas. Moore, Mrs. L. H. Hetzer, and Ralph and George Hudson all of this place to mourn her death.  Two brothers, Samuel Morris of Dallas, Texas and Geo. Morris of Pittsburgh, Kansas also survive.

Funeral services were held at the family home in the south part of town on Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock by Elder R.A. Odenweller of Pleasanton.  His remarks were very beautiful and he pictured the kind and loving woman who had fought life’s battles to the end and through it all maintained a sweet friendship for all.  After the ceremony at the home the large concourse of grief stricken friends interred the body of the departed on in the Oak Lawn cemetery.

 The La Cygne Weekly Journal, La Cygne, Kansas, 8 April 1904, Page 1, Column 3

Sunday’s Obituary – Frederick Hudson of La Cygne, Kansas

Frederick Hudson is my 3rd great grand father on my maternal side.

Sierra 3rd Great Grandpa

I found this obituary at the Kansas State Archives last weekend.  I was so excited to find an obituary that offered so much information!  Definitely another dancing at the microfilm reader moment.  You know you are among friends when other researchers do not look at you funny but instead smile at your victory dance.  My favorite part of the obituary is the description of the moments when Fred passed away.  La Cygne is pronounced La Scene.  Thank you to my Kansas cousins for teaching me this!!

 

Old Citizen Passes Away

Fred Hudson died at his home in the south part of town Tuesday evening.  He had been a resident of La Cygne since 1880 and had an active part in building the town.  Bricklayer and plasterer by trade, soon after coming here he started a brick yard and began manufacturing brick.  Most of the brick buildings in town are built with the Hudson brick.  Because of failing health Mr. Hudson quit active work several years ago.

Frederick Hudson was born in Scalford, Leicestershire, England, August 22, 1834, and died in La Cygne, Kan., May 22, 1923, at the age of 88 years and 9 months.

When about nine years of age he came with his parents to America, making the voyage in a sail ship.  Landing at New Orleans he traveled up the Mississippi River to Illinois, where he grew to manhood and worked with his father at the bricklaying and plastering trade which he followed so many years.

He was married to Sarah G Morris at Milton, Ill., on December 30, 1855.  To this union were born ten children, four of whom are still living and were with him when the end came.  With his family he moved to La Cygne, January 1, 1880 and since the death of his wife, 19 years ago he has made his home with his son Ralph and family who have cared for him so devotedly, sparing no pains to make his life as pleasant as it was possible to do.  Two or three years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis but recovered sufficiently to be around most of the time, until last Friday morning when he had a serious attack and never fully regained consciousness.  He made a confession of religion in his early manhood and later united with the Christian church at La Cygne during Rev. Irwin’s meetings several years ago and was one of the deacons of the church for some time, but owing to his age and failing health he had not been very active in church work in late years.

He was an honest, upright citizen, honorable in all his dealings, a good neighbor, a devoted husband, a kind and loving father and a friend to those in need.  He bore his sufferings patiently with never a murmur or complaint, and after a life of usefulness he passed peacefully away just as the sun was sinking to rest, and when the spirit was taking its flight he quietly laid his hands down as though he had finished his work and passed to his reward.  His wife and two sons, W.B. and George H., and one daughter, Mrs. Belle Howard preceded him in death several years ago; also three children died in infancy.

He leaves one son, Ralph, of La Cygne; three daughters, Mrs. Clem Lawbaugh of Wellington, Mrs. Minnie Hetzer and Mrs. Sytha Moore of Parker, eighteen grand children, eight great-grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Boyer at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hudson and the body was laid to rest in Oak LawnCemetery.

Those from out of town for the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Moore and children and Mr. and Mrs. L.H. Hetzer of Parker; Mrs Clem Lawbaugh and son of Wellington; Mrs. Ida Hudson, Mrs, Irvin Wagner and Mrs. Hazel Smith of Kansas City; Fred Moore of Miami Station, Mo.

KansasState Archives
Microfilm L20: La Cygne Journal, July 1, 1921-June 27, 1924
The La Cygne Journal, La Cygne, Kansas
Friday, 25 May 1923
Page 2, column 1

 

 

Genealogy Jackpot!

In the middle of April I traveled to Northern Virginia to visit with my parents.  While there, I made a deal that I would help my mom with some computer issues and in return she would watch my kids for a day so I could visit the Daughters of the American Revolution Library.

For me, the day spent in the library was like riding a rainbow and finding the jackpot of genealogy gold at the other end.   I arrived with a four page list of books I wanted to look at.  All day I was making finds and shoring up research I have already completed.  I would have been happy with the information I found in the first five hours of the day.  I had no idea the day was going to get even better.

I wanted to end the day with further research on my Lawbaugh line.  As part of my research I have already checked online trees to get clues where I needed to look.  I had a feeling that I could connect my Lawbaughs via Kansas, Illinois, Ohio and Pennsylvania to Johannes Laubach.  Even with the online information, I want to conduct my own research for originals to prove my hypothesis.  I currently have research completed for my line up to William Lawbaugh (1823-1896) m. Lydia Ummel.  I have collected death certificates, obituaries, and cemetery information for the family.  My research log has finding marriage and birth information for both of them next on the list.

The jackpot moment at DAR came just after 3pm.  I made my way over to the Seimes Technology Center to look up a book called “An Ancestor To Remember: Johannes Laubach (Labach-Lawbaugh 1728-1808) of Chester County, Penna.” by Mrs. William T. Alston.  I had found the book in the online catalog during my pre-visit research.  The librarian in the room helped me to find the scanned book in the digital collection.  She was concerned because I had under an hour left in the day to get through an 170 page book.  I was almost immediately excited because the index listed names in order of descendent and the page numbers they would be found on.  I quickly found my William Lawbaugh and realized I only needed to get through the first 55 pages of the book.  I started hitting the print button on each page in case I ran out of time.  I plan on going back and looking at the rest of the book on another visit.

I had a couple of moments where I had to shut my mouth to not scream in delight.  Instead I was punching my fists into the air like a boxer with a punching bag!  Not only did this book list my William Lawbaugh and his direct line to Johannes Laubach, it also included his descendants including my mother! There are lots of photos of important cemetery markers and photocopies of church records. The most important is the author included her sources.  I have a road map to follow on my own research!

It still gets even better.  The reference librarian was scanning the pages I was printing and  mentioned to me that I should run back over to the Library room to pull a book by Stassburger/Hinke.  The book was listed as one of the author’s sources for date of arrival in Pennsylvania.  With just 15 minutes before closing, I rushed back over and went straight to the reference librarian to get assistance to find the book.  As I quickly flipped to the pages for my ancestor Johannes Laubach, I realized that this book contained signatures of people who arrived in the British Colonies from Germany.  Upon arriving in the British Colonies, passengers were required to sign an oath to England and an oath of abjuration for Germany.

I have the signature of my ancestor who was born in 1728 and arrived in Pennsylvania on the Two Brothers on September 15, 1748!!!  Holy Genealogy Jackpot!!  Even now, a month later, I am giddy with excitement about this find.  I have to give a huge shout out to the librarians at the DAR Library.  I would have missed this jackpot if they were not so knowledgeable about the library collections. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

Laubach signature

Sunday’s Obituary – Lydia Ummel Lawbaugh

Lydia Ummel is one of my maternal great-great-great-grandmothers.

Lawbaugh to Lydia Ummel

This obituary is one of the best I have ever seen.  Not only does it tell me where she lived, it gives a death date, cause of death, madien name, birthplace, number of siblings, migration information, marriage information, and what church she attended.  I wish all obituraries held so many clues!!

 

Geneseo Republic
Geneseo, Henry, Illinois
March 18, 1898
Page 4, Column 1

Mrs. Lydia Lawbaugh, widow of the late Wm Lawbaugh, died at her home, corner of Second and Stewart streets, at noon Tuesday, March 15th, 1898, of heart trouble from whjch [sic] she had been suffering for  over 20 years.  The maiden name of the deceased was Lydia Ummel.  She was born in Juinata county, Pa., Aug. 21st, 1823, being one of a family of five children all but one of whom, as sister who resides at Spokane, Wash., are now dead.  Deceased moved to West Salem, O., in 1832, and Nov. 22d, 1849, was married there to her late husband whose death occurred Feb. 17th, 1896.  She leaves two children, Mrs. Miles, of this city, who has cared for her since Mr. Lawbaugh’s death, and William J., of southern Kansas.  Deceased moved to Henry county in 1854, and in 1862 settled in this city, which has since been her home.  She united with the Evangelical Association church fifty-seven years ago, and in her daily life was an exemplay [sic] christian.  She leaves many warm friends, especially in her church circle, who sincerely mourn her death.  Funeral service was conducted at her late home Thursday at 2 p.m. and her body was laid beside that of her husband.

Wedding Wedesday – Lawbaugh Mitchell Wedding Announcement

I was so excited to find this wedding annoucement on newspaperarchive.com this week.  It features my maternal grandparents.  The timing could not be better as I fly down to Southern California on Monday to visit with my grandma.  I can’t wait to bring her a printed copy as a surprise!

Hutchinson News Herald, June 25, 1950, Page 7, Column 1

 

Wedding vows for Roberta Mitchell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.M. Mitchell, and William H. Lawbaugh, son of Mrs. Effie Lawbaugh of Bell Gardens, Calif., were wed at 8pm Saturday in 10th Avenue Evangelical United Brethren Church by Rev. C.H. Hartmann.  Organist, Mrs. Floyd Leatherman, and Duain Crain, vocalist, gave wedding music.

The church was decorated with two pair of candelabra, greenery and white satin bows.  Geraldine Linegarger of Emporia was maid of honor and Mrs. G.E. Cogzill, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid.  Robert Scruton of Wichita was best man.  Ushers were Raymond Mitchell of Augusta, Delbert and Kenneth Mitchell, brothers of the bride.  Donnie and Connie Cogzill, twin nephew and niece of the bride were rind bearer and flower girl respectively.  Tapers were lighted by Delores McAdams of Wichita and Betty Gragg of Guymon.

The bride wore a gown of white satin trimmed with nylon illusion net and a nylon illusion veil held by a crocheted ruffle.  She wore pearls, gift of the bridegroom, and a white Bible topped with an orchid corsage.

Her attendants wore ballerina gowns of pink and blue, mitts and nylon illusion veils held by crocheted ruffles.  They carried pink corsages on white Testaments.  The taper lighters wore yellow dresses and the flower girl wore a gown of white organza over pink taffeta.  Mrs. Cogzill made the bride’s dress and veil and the attendants veils and mitts.

A reception will be held in the Mitchell home with Mrs. Ruby Elliott of Salina in charge of the guest book.  Mmes  Raymond Mitchell of Augusta, Kenneth and Delbert Mitchell assisted at the reception.

For going away the bride wore a tan silk dress with brown and white accessories.  After short wedding trip the couple will be at home in Wichita where Mr. Lawbaugh is employed by Southwestern Bell Telephone company.  Mrs. Lawbaugh has just completed two years of X-Ray training at Wesley hospital in Wichita.